Where my fellow cooks at???

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Re: Where my fellow cooks at???

Postby columbia on Sun Aug 25, 2013 9:40 am

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Re: Where my fellow cooks at???

Postby tifosi77 on Sun Aug 25, 2013 11:30 am

Conceptually I get the technique, but 140°F is way too hot for salmon unless you're goal is to make it into paste. Be interested in cooking pork chops that way, tho....
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Re: Where my fellow cooks at???

Postby tifosi77 on Mon Aug 26, 2013 4:33 pm

Anyone use Japanese cutlery? The handle on my trusty Wustof has been cracked for several years, and it's starting to come undone. I've been giving some thought to Japanese-made western-style knives, like this Gyuto by Suisin.
Image

For the money (~$130 for a 9" knife) I really think they're hard to beat.
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Re: Where my fellow cooks at???

Postby Shyster on Mon Aug 26, 2013 4:46 pm

I use inexpensive Victorinox / Forschner knives (and sharpen them regularly to make up for their cheapness), but my brother has some Global knives and really likes them.
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Re: Where my fellow cooks at???

Postby Shyster on Mon Aug 26, 2013 4:49 pm

Oh, and tifosi, I wanted to thank you for posting the equilibrium-brining method. I used that to brine some country-style ribs overnight, after which I dried them off and then hit them with a salt-free rub for another four hours. They were then indirect gilled. The end result was some of the most tender ribs I've ever made.
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Re: Where my fellow cooks at???

Postby tifosi77 on Mon Aug 26, 2013 6:35 pm

I've heard some good things about those Global knives (they seem to be popular in the cheffy crowd), but I've never really liked them that much. Ymmv, I guess.

Equilibrium brining is for real. I like the way it firms up the texture as well, gives a more substantial chew. Glad you tried it!
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Re: Where my fellow cooks at???

Postby OutofFoil on Tue Aug 27, 2013 2:43 am

tifosi77 wrote:Anyone use Japanese cutlery? The handle on my trusty Wustof has been cracked for several years, and it's starting to come undone. I've been giving some thought to Japanese-made western-style knives, like this Gyuto by Suisin.
Image

For the money (~$130 for a 9" knife) I really think they're hard to beat.


My first "good" knife was a Henckles Twin Four Star II 8" Chef's. I like it and have had it for 6-7 years, stays sharp long, just a good knife. My wife doesn't like it due to it having a larger man-sized handle.

We recently picked up some Shun's. (Expensive, but if you watch for online deals, you can get them at a reasonable price). We have the 11" Shun Ken Onion slicer we got for $100 on a Black Friday deal. Strange look, but very comfortable in one's hand. Ambidexterous design, which is good as I'm left handed and the Mrs. is right handed. Super sharp, hold a good edge, beautiful slices of fish and meat with one continuous stroke.

Also have the Shun Ken Onion 4.5" paring knife, look this one up, weird angled blade, but again, it's awesome. Clearance sale find for $40. Can do all sorts of artsy things with it. Might be my wife's favorite knife.

Finally, we got lucky and after our wedding, we used gift cards to get the Shun Hiro Dual Density 5.5" utility knife for $150. This knife is beautiful. Two different styles of serration. Good for everything from bread to tomatoes. perfect slices of bread and can cut paper thin, mess free slices of tomato. With a potato, can cut so thin, one can see through the slice! Did I say it's beautiful?

All the above are damascus style steel, the Hiro is 65 layers of alternating nickle and stainless, whereas the Ken Onions' are 33 layers. Too much work to put up pics, but google them, they are beautiful and SHARP! PITA to sharpen as they use the odd 17 degree japanese angle, but Shun offers a free sharpening service, just send it in to the factory. We haven't had to use this yet as if you treat them properly, them seem to hold an edge for quite some time.
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Re: Where my fellow cooks at???

Postby BadHands71 on Tue Aug 27, 2013 6:14 am

OutofFoil wrote:
tifosi77 wrote:Anyone use Japanese cutlery? The handle on my trusty Wustof has been cracked for several years, and it's starting to come undone. I've been giving some thought to Japanese-made western-style knives, like this Gyuto by Suisin.
Image

For the money (~$130 for a 9" knife) I really think they're hard to beat.


My first "good" knife was a Henckles Twin Four Star II 8" Chef's. I like it and have had it for 6-7 years, stays sharp long, just a good knife. My wife doesn't like it due to it having a larger man-sized handle.

We recently picked up some Shun's. (Expensive, but if you watch for online deals, you can get them at a reasonable price). We have the 11" Shun Ken Onion slicer we got for $100 on a Black Friday deal. Strange look, but very comfortable in one's hand. Ambidexterous design, which is good as I'm left handed and the Mrs. is right handed. Super sharp, hold a good edge, beautiful slices of fish and meat with one continuous stroke.

Also have the Shun Ken Onion 4.5" paring knife, look this one up, weird angled blade, but again, it's awesome. Clearance sale find for $40. Can do all sorts of artsy things with it. Might be my wife's favorite knife.

Finally, we got lucky and after our wedding, we used gift cards to get the Shun Hiro Dual Density 5.5" utility knife for $150. This knife is beautiful. Two different styles of serration. Good for everything from bread to tomatoes. perfect slices of bread and can cut paper thin, mess free slices of tomato. With a potato, can cut so thin, one can see through the slice! Did I say it's beautiful?

All the above are damascus style steel, the Hiro is 65 layers of alternating nickle and stainless, whereas the Ken Onions' are 33 layers. Too much work to put up pics, but google them, they are beautiful and SHARP! PITA to sharpen as they use the odd 17 degree japanese angle, but Shun offers a free sharpening service, just send it in to the factory. We haven't had to use this yet as if you treat them properly, them seem to hold an edge for quite some time.


Mr. BadHands71 pretty much covered it. We're big fans of the Shun knives in our household. I've tried the Global knives and wasn't that impressed. Wusthof knives are nice but a little expensive for quality. They used to better quality IMO. I feel the same way about Henkels. Certain styles of Henkels knives are annoying for me because of the size and shape of the handles. I would highly recommend going to a store that allows you to hold them like Williams Sonoma or Sur La Table. What fits well in the hand and is comfortable varies for each person, it's just a question of finding what works for you.
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Re: Where my fellow cooks at???

Postby OutofFoil on Tue Aug 27, 2013 6:52 am

Mr. BadHands?!?!?! WTF, I see how it is... how about Outoffoil?
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Re: Where my fellow cooks at???

Postby BadHands71 on Tue Aug 27, 2013 7:18 am

OutofFoil wrote:Mr. BadHands?!?!?! WTF, I see how it is... how about Outoffoil?


Lol, I was here first. Okay, I give in, you don't have to be Mr. BadHands.
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Re: Where my fellow cooks at???

Postby BadHands71 on Tue Aug 27, 2013 7:20 am

Okay, getting back on topic, I have a question for the cooks on the board.

We'll be in South Africa over Thanksgiving which goes without saying is a disappointment for any food lover. I won't be able to get a turkey here (and there are two of us so that wouldn't really make much sense anyway). I was thinking about doing a chicken the traditional way (brined, stuffed, baked). I'm just not sure how it would turn out. Or should I just abandon the tradition idea and make stuffing on the side and have ham or pork roast? I'm open to any ideas to replace Thanksgiving turkey. Pretty much everything else that is traditional for Thanksgiving will be doable.
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Re: Where my fellow cooks at???

Postby canaan on Tue Aug 27, 2013 8:39 am

can we get OoF's name changed to mrbadhands? that made me raff hard.
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Re: Where my fellow cooks at???

Postby OutofFoil on Tue Aug 27, 2013 8:57 am

canaan wrote:can we get OoF's name changed to mrbadhands? that made me raff hard.


Ouch.
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Re: Where my fellow cooks at???

Postby Shyster on Tue Aug 27, 2013 5:05 pm

tifosi77 wrote:I've heard some good things about those Global knives (they seem to be popular in the cheffy crowd), but I've never really liked them that much. Ymmv, I guess.

They do have a unique appearance. Personally, I like the combination of my stamped-steel Victorinoxes and my Chef’s Choice electric sharpener. Sure, I need to sharpen the stamped knives more often and consequently I’m grinding them away faster, but I don't think I paid more than $30 for any of them.
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Re: Where my fellow cooks at???

Postby tifosi77 on Tue Aug 27, 2013 6:31 pm

BadHands71 wrote:Okay, getting back on topic, I have a question for the cooks on the board.

We'll be in South Africa over Thanksgiving which goes without saying is a disappointment for any food lover. I won't be able to get a turkey here (and there are two of us so that wouldn't really make much sense anyway). I was thinking about doing a chicken the traditional way (brined, stuffed, baked). I'm just not sure how it would turn out. Or should I just abandon the tradition idea and make stuffing on the side and have ham or pork roast? I'm open to any ideas to replace Thanksgiving turkey. Pretty much everything else that is traditional for Thanksgiving will be doable.

It will be much easier to make a successful meal if you let the region you're in talk to you and tell you what's what. Don't know much about SA, but I do know that game animals are very popular there, as is lamb.

My in-laws were in SA for vacay a couple years ago and they still go on about the trip like it was last week. Left an impression.

Shyster wrote:
tifosi77 wrote:I've heard some good things about those Global knives (they seem to be popular in the cheffy crowd), but I've never really liked them that much. Ymmv, I guess.

They do have a unique appearance. Personally, I like the combination of my stamped-steel Victorinoxes and my Chef’s Choice electric sharpener. Sure, I need to sharpen the stamped knives more often and consequently I’m grinding them away faster, but I don't think I paid more than $30 for any of them.

The Victorinoxes are not bad, given the price point. I'd be happy to use one in a low-mileage blade, like a bread knife or even a flexible boning or filet knife. But I use my chef's knife for probably 80% of my blade work, so I don't mind investing a few shekels in one if it cuts cleanly and with minimal drag. (Of course, almost any properly sharp knife will do that trick)
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Re: Where my fellow cooks at???

Postby tifosi77 on Tue Aug 27, 2013 6:36 pm

Along those lines, check out the demonstration videos at ChefSteps.

Do You Need an Expensive Knife?


The Benefits of Sharp Knives


How to Sharpen a Knife


They've even created a whole curriculum on the subject in their Knife Sharpening Course
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Re: Where my fellow cooks at???

Postby shmenguin on Tue Aug 27, 2013 8:29 pm

We put beer in our chili this weekend. Not a fan.
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Re: Where my fellow cooks at???

Postby tifosi77 on Tue Aug 27, 2013 8:35 pm

My wife uses it as a marinade for the beef -- delicious.
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Re: Where my fellow cooks at???

Postby shmenguin on Tue Aug 27, 2013 8:39 pm

That's a little more subtle than just dumping a bottle into the crockpot. It ended up too sweet.

What kind of beer does she use?
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Re: Where my fellow cooks at???

Postby BadHands71 on Wed Aug 28, 2013 5:03 am

shmenguin wrote:That's a little more subtle than just dumping a bottle into the crockpot. It ended up too sweet.

What kind of beer does she use?


A dry or coffee stout seems to be preferable for most cooking uses. OutofFoil uses either Java Head or a similar stout in his chili when cooking the meat in a skillet. It creates a delicious result. When cooking with beer, the earlier you add it, the more sugar cooks off and the less sweet your dish will be. Generally adding the beer when cooking the meat works well.
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Re: Where my fellow cooks at???

Postby tifosi77 on Wed Aug 28, 2013 9:37 am

Depends, might be something as cheap as a 40 of Bud or she might go swanky and use a couple bottles of Shiner Bock. I personally like it better when she uses more of a pils style beer.
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Re: Where my fellow cooks at???

Postby shmenguin on Wed Aug 28, 2013 9:43 am

i used a dogfish head 90 minute IPA. that may have been too assertive.
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Re: Where my fellow cooks at???

Postby tifosi77 on Wed Aug 28, 2013 9:46 am

If you're putting the beer into the chili - like as a liquid for the stew - then yes I can see an IPA becoming practically non-potable. As it cooks down, the actual liquid level is reducing and concentrating flavors. I can imagine after just a few minutes of cooking an IPA would become like aggro bitter.

I've made chili using wine as a liquid base, and even that can take on a certain funk if you're not careful.
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Re: Where my fellow cooks at???

Postby BadHands71 on Wed Aug 28, 2013 9:57 am

tifosi77 wrote:If you're putting the beer into the chili - like as a liquid for the stew - then yes I can see an IPA becoming practically non-potable. As it cooks down, the actual liquid level is reducing and concentrating flavors. I can imagine after just a few minutes of cooking an IPA would become like aggro bitter.

I've made chili using wine as a liquid base, and even that can take on a certain funk if you're not careful.


Agreed. Cooking with any kind of alcohol can be tricky. I tried to make a bourbon glaze from scratch and wasn't paying attention to what I was doing and added the bourbon too early. It was horrid and got thrown away.
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Re: Where my fellow cooks at???

Postby the wicked child on Wed Aug 28, 2013 10:07 am

I typically use lagers when I want to cook with beer, or at least milder flavored ales. I have been known to buy variety packs from time to time just to have a few beers in my closet that can be used for cooking.

Of course, I have to force myself to drink the rest of them. ;)
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